PRECISION MEDICINE SUMMIT: A HIMSS EVENT

Boston, MA
Westin Boston Waterfront
June 12-13, 2017

Schedule

8:30am - 9:00am
Breakfast and Badge Pick-Up
Grand Ballroom CDE

Breakfast will be served in the ballroom so make sure to stop by the sponsor tables.

9:00am - 9:05am
Welcome Remarks
Grand Ballroom CDE

Tom
Sullivan
Editor-in-Chief
Healthcare IT News

9:05am - 9:50am

Opening Keynote

Accelerating Precision Medicine for Everyone: The NIH's "All of Us Research" Program
Grand Ballroom CDE

Eric
Dishman
Director of All of Us Research Program
National Institutes of Health

9:50am - 10:05am
Patients Are Demanding Precision. Ready?
Grand Ballroom CDE

Based on Bryce Olson’s advanced cancer prognosis, he should not be alive today. But he fought cancer differently. He used the data from genomic sequencing to break into a perfect-fit targeted drug trial that shut his cancer down for two years. Bryce has a unique perspective as both patient and technology strategist on the leading edge of genomics and precision medicine. Learn why 2017 will be the year patients start demanding precision medicine and how new solutions emerging from Intel and others will unleash a new era of biomedical insights and clinical genomics at the point of care. 

Bryce
Olson
Global Strategist, Health and Life Sciences
Intel

10:05am - 10:45am

State of the Industry

Precision Medicine Today and Tomorrow - Where are We Going and How Do We Get There?
Grand Ballroom CDE

Despite amazing technological breakthroughs for precision medicine, government champions, and continuing and significant investment, challenges exist related to appropriate regulatory guidelines, suitable reimbursement, and the education of healthcare professionals.

In this kick-off leadership panel, our experts discuss the current state of precision medicine and how to overcome these challenges. Additionally, they’ll address how to realistically:

  • Build on the current advancements with precision medicine technologies.
  • Streamline the process to clinical practice and make precision medicine easily understandable to the general public.
  • Make sure precision medicine and individualized treatments are available for all patients in need.
Amy
Simpson
Director, Industry Principal
Pegasystems, Inc.
Tom
Sullivan
Editor-in-Chief
Healthcare IT News
Eric
Dishman
Director of All of Us Research Program
National Institutes of Health
India
Hook-Barnard
Director of Research Strategy, Associate Director, Precision Medicine
University of California, San Francisco
Megan
Mahoney
Chief of General Primary Care in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health
Stanford University

10:45am - 11:15am
Networking Break
Grand Ballroom CDE

Take this opportunity to mingle with your peers in a relaxed setting to build relationships and establish future partnerships. Coffee will be served in the ballroom area so make sure to stop by our sponsor tables.

11:15am - 11:50pm

Featured Speaker

Moving Genomics to General Practice
Grand Ballroom CDE

Genomics is a well established field in medicine that has existed for more than 50 years. Now we face the prospect of moving the knowledge and practice of this field into everyday patient care for practitioners of every specialty. This comes with many challenges. Genomic medicine as it exists is somewhat inefficient and is not scalable. There are educational, technical, financial, and legal barriers to expanding this field across medicine. Dr Walton discusses the challenges of scaling genomic medicine and the hope and promise it holds based on patients we are treating today.

Nephi
Walton
Biomedical Informaticist, Genetics Fellow
Washington University School of Medicine

11:50am - 12:30pm

Precision Health

Creating a New Model of Prevention and Wellness in Primary Care
Grand Ballroom CDE

The central promise of precision medicine is the identification of predictors of disease and wellness that can guide interventions. How to apply precision medicine data and techniques in the medical discipline most focused on prevention, primary care, is largely unknown.  The delivery of such care, which Stanford is calling “Precision Health”, in a way that is most valued by patients and clinicians alike requires study.

Stanford Health Care has embarked on a practice redesign process to develop a team-based model of primary care. EMR based patient, population, and operations dashboards were created to support analytics capacity for proactive and personalized point of care and population health management in the primary care space. We are piloting this new model of care along with genetics counseling, genomic sequencing and pharmacogenomics testing services among a cohort new Stanford Primary Care patients to better understand and describe best practices, opportunities, and patient archetypes as part of the clinical application of Precision Health in the general primary care population.

In this talk, we will present our methodology, planning and early findings of the implementation of precision medicine in a primary care setting. 

Megan
Mahoney
Chief of General Primary Care in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health
Stanford University
Christopher
Sharp
Chief Medical Information Officer
Stanford University School of Medicine

12:30pm - 1:30pm
Networking Lunch
Grand Ballroom CDE

Take this opportunity to mingle with your peers in a relaxed setting to build relationships and establish future partnerships.

 

1:30pm - 2:10pm

Real-Life Story

Overcoming Obstacles, Seizing Opportunities, and Curing Cancer
Grand Ballroom CDE

The obstacles to personalized medicine include the high cost of precision cancer drugs, the challenge of getting patients fully engaged in their own care, a lack of mature, universal interoperability, and questions about the effectiveness of precision medicine interventions. This presentation will address these issues, concluding with a case report about Kathy Halamka, who was successfully treated for breast cancer with the help of several digital tools, include SHRINE, i2b2, and Clinical Query 2.

Takeaways

  • The cost effectiveness of personalized medicine is a work in progress.
  • Carefully selected mobile apps will help get patients engaged in personalized care.
  • Software suites and clinical research databases are already demonstrating the value of precision medicine.

 

Paul
Cerrato
Contributing Editor/Writer
Medpage Today
John
Halamka
Chief Information Officer
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

2:10pm - 2:45pm

Unlocking Value

Solving the Informatics Challenges in Precision Medicine
Grand Ballroom CDE

Penn Medicine, a $4.3 billion health care provider organization consisting of more than 2,000 physicians, is a leader in the rapidly developing field of precision medicine and was one of the first healthcare institutions in the United States to create a senior executive position to drive the development of targeted, individualized therapies.

Advances in genomics hold promise for delivering clinical care that will be personalized to the needs of individual patients. But as healthcare IT professionals begin planning investments that will allow them to be ready for this new chapter, many questions are emerging. 

In this session, Brian Wells, associate vice president of health technology and academic computing, will outline the strategic decisions that will be required to enable clinicians and researchers to uncover the genetic underpinnings of disease, mine unstructured data and provide real-time decision support.

Brian
Wells
Associate Vice President of Health Technology and Academic Computing
Penn Medicine

2:45pm - 3:10pm
Networking Break
Grand Ballroom CDE

Take this opportunity to mingle with your peers in a relaxed setting to build relationships and establish future partnerships. Coffee will be served in the ballroom so make sure to stop by our sponsor tables.

3:10pm - 3:45pm

Data Streams

Precision Medicine is More Than Genomics
Grand Ballroom CDE

This presentation explores the coming essential role of precision medicine in healthcare and the road to personalized medicine. Hook-Barnard will discuss opportunities for integration and application of data from across the spectrum of health (e.g. social, environmental, molecular factors) to inform prediction of individual risk, guide tailored prevention strategies and improve early screening and diagnostics. She will discuss how applying precision medicine across healthcare is not only good medicine but also good science. 

India
Hook-Barnard
Director of Research Strategy, Associate Director, Precision Medicine
University of California, San Francisco

3:45pm - 4:20pm

Avoiding Missteps

Four Legal Issues for Providers of Precision Medicine
Grand Ballroom CDE

There are many legal barriers facing providers and researchers in precision medicine initiatives: 1) how to navigate research and privacy protections to use the data gathered; 2) how to provide affordable testing for patients without running afoul of fraud and abuse laws; 3) how to use results responsibly as the data evolves and 4) discrimination. This presentation covers the legal issues surrounding these four areas, with advice on how to avoid any missteps. 

Sharon
Zehe
Attorney for
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic and Mayo Medical Laboratories

4:20pm - 4:55pm

A Crystal Ball for CRISPR

How Genome Editing Might Re-Shape the Medical Landscape
Grand Ballroom CDE

The discovery of genome-editing enzymes such as CRISPR-Cas9 has resulted in a frenzy of efforts to develop new therapeutics to address genetic disease. The ability to make deliberate modifications to a patient’s genome holds extraordinary potential, but when and how will genetic surgery become widely accessible?

Ross Wilson is currently developing new technologies to help move genome editing from the lab to the clinic. In this session, he will provide a forecast of how CRISPR-based genome editing will take root as a powerful form of precision medicine. As opposed to ZFN and TALEN technology, CRISPR enzymes can easily be programmed with to match a patient’s specific genetic needs. It is likely that genome editing therapy will routinely be accompanied by sequencing to inform design of a personalized therapeutic. As more animal studies and clinical trials are initiated over the next decade, we will begin to learn the true capabilities of genome editing, as well as the precautions needed to ensure safe therapies. 

Ross
Wilson
Project Scientist & Principal Investigator
University of California Berkeley, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

4:55pm - 5:00pm
Final Remarks
Grand Ballroom CDE

Tom
Sullivan
Editor-in-Chief
Healthcare IT News

5:00pm - 6:00pm
Networking Reception
Grand Ballroom CDE

After a day of informative and incisive presentations, enjoy a drink and hors d'oeuvres in the ballroom with your fellow attendees, speakers and sponsors. 

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